Starting Innovative Change #IMMOOC

I love the conversation around innovation in education. George Couros’ definition of innovation (something that is both new and better) allows for a wide interpretation of innovation in a time when many associate the term exclusively with tech-laden change.

When we get it right, being innovative often helps makes our work focus more on learning than on just getting school done well.

I don’t think anyone disagrees that being great at learning is much better than simply being great at school, but sometimes it’s tough to know just how to begin this kind of change. Here are three easy ways you can start this week:

1. Write down a few people you plan to learn from at school this week. Put it on your calendar. Make sure someone follows up with you.

2. Pick out something that is part of your routine and ask yourself why you do things that way.

3. Model the learning you want your students to develop. Force yourself to share not only what you are learning but also a little about what that process looks like for you.

Whatever you do, use the influence you have to make school a place of incredible learning.


I’ll be writing more about my own journey with innovation over the next few weeks as part of this MOOC (massive open online course) centered around George Couros’ book The Innovator’s Mindset. This week, we were challenged to write posts in under 200 words. Check out the #IMMOOC hashtag to see some conversation about innovation in education, and look for the #IMMOOCB1, #IMMOOCB2, and & #IMMOOCB3 for more of these short posts. 

7 thoughts on “Starting Innovative Change #IMMOOC

    1. Hi Aaron,
      Love that you pack so much wisdom into 200 words! That will be a challenge for me! 😉 Your three steps are a perfect starting point for spreading innovative practice. Thanks for that.
      Jen

  1. I’m not an administrator. I’m a classroom teacher. I learn from my teammates everyday. But we live together in four open classrooms. How I can learn from my colleagues in other buildings is a challenge. But a challenge that can’t be overcome. We all have the same 24 hours in a day, so how I choose to use my time at school is somewhat up to me. I just have to want to learn from others.

    1. Starting with something small that you can build into you’re schedule is easier than other methods, and it leads to meaningful hangs more often than not. Good luck taking on something new! It’ll. Be worth it!

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